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Claiming to “Specialize” or Provide “Advanced” Services is a Breach of the Bylaws

CMTBC is aware that some registrants advertise that they “specialize” in, or they are “advanced” in particular modalities or treatment of defined population groups. Registrants advertising in this manner are hereby advised to stop doing so and to amend their advertising materials immediately.

Restriction on Specialist Titles

Under section 78.8 of the CMTBC Bylaws, registrants are not permitted to advertise any special competency or practice.

78.8 Unless otherwise authorized under the Act, a Registrant must

  1. not use the title “specialist” or any similar designation, term or reference that suggests a recognized special status, accreditation or practice on any letterhead or business card or in any other marketing activity,
  2. take all reasonable steps to discourage use, in relation to the Registrant by another person, of the title “specialist” or any similar designation suggesting a recognized special status or accreditation in any marketing activity, and
  3. in any advertisement, identify herself as being responsible for the practice advertised.

In other regulated health professions, titles indicating that someone is a “specialist” (i.e. Orthodontist vs. Dentist) are granted to registrants that have obtained additional academic and practical qualifications by their regulatory body. Within the scope of practice of massage therapy, to claim that one “specializes” in a particular modality (eg. “specializing in deep tissue massage”) or population group (eg. “specializing in geriatric care”) suggests that a registrant has certain recognized knowledge or skills beyond that of other registrants. Similarly, terms like “advanced” when used to describe a particular modality (eg. “providing advanced myofascial release”) or population group (eg. “providing advanced care for elite athletes”) suggest that a registrant has recognized knowledge or skills beyond that of other registrants.

The College Bylaws do not currently provide for any specialist titles or any similar designation, term or reference that suggests a recognized special status, accreditation or practice. Any violation of the above noted Bylaw may be subject to discipline under the Health Professions Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 183.

Permitted Practice Descriptions

Under section 78.9 (2) of the College Bylaws, registrants may identify a “preferred area of practice” provided they don’t otherwise use any other expression that suggests a speciality.

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Parisotto, CMTBC Director, Inquiry and Discipline, at 604.736.3404 ext. 106.

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