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Quality Assurance Frequently Asked Questions

CMTBC is committed to ensuring that all RMTs are aware of and understand changes to the redesigned Quality Assurance program. This FAQs page will be updated on a regular basis.

General Quality Assurance

Will the Quality Assurance program change as a result of the amalgamation on June 28?

No. While the new Quality Assurance program may change and evolve over time, we expect that the program will remain the same once the amalgamated college – College of Complementary Health Professionals of British Columbia (CCHPBC) – is created on June 28, 2024. Please note that references to CMTBC in these FAQs also, where appropriate, refer to CCHPBC.

Is there a Cycle 14?

No, there is no Cycle 14.

The last Quality Assurance cycle was Cycle 13, which ran from November 1, 2020 to October 31, 2022.

Will CMTBC review applications for approval of continuing education courses and instructors?

No, CMTBC will no longer review applications for approval of continuing education courses and/or instructors.

I initially became registered as a Practising RMT in the fall of November 2023. Am I required to complete quality assurance requirements in 2024?

Yes. RMTs who hold Practising status as of January 1, 2024 or have reinstated their registration with the College on or before March 31, 2024 are required to complete both the mandatory CMTBC-authored online course on Indigenous cultural safety, humility, and anti-racism and the yearly Practice Development Program (PDP) as registration renewal requirements for 2025.

RMTs who initially registered with the College on or after January 1, 2024, have converted from Non-practising to Practising status on or after January 1, 2024, or who reinstated their registration with the College on or after April 1, 2024 are not required to complete the mandatory CMTBC-authored online course on Indigenous cultural safety, humility, and anti-racism or the yearly PDP as registration renewal requirements for 2025.

I have completed Module 2 of the mandatory online course, Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-racism, but do not have access to the Module 2 quiz. What do I do?

Each module within the Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-racism course has release conditions that need to be meet before an end of module quiz is released. The release conditions include completion of all Reflection questions within Module 2. To complete the Reflection questions, you must write your answers to the Reflection questions in the text boxes provided and save your responses.  Once all Reflection questions are answered and saved, you will gain access to the end of module quiz.

Practice Development Program

If I completed a continuing education course/activity in 2023, can it be applied toward my Practice Development Program (PDP) requirement?

No, a continuing education course/activities completed in 2023 cannot be used toward your 2024 PDP requirement. As part of the PDP, RMTs will select their registrant-directed learning activities for 2024 after completion of their self-assessment and learning plan.

Once an RMT has completed their self-assessment, they will move on to development of a learning plan. The learning plan will consist of two learning goals, and two registrant-directed learning activities, one for each learning goal. The RMT’s learning goals will address the competencies identified in the RMT’s self-assessment summary report as needing improvement. 

How many credits do I need to obtain each year? Is there a requirement to complete a certain number of hours of learning activities?

Learning activities within the PDP are not assigned credits, and there is no requirement to complete a certain number of hours of these activities. The requirement is that the learning activities must achieve the RMT’s stated learning goals. Depending on an RMT’s learning goal, the learning activity chosen will vary. For example, one RMT may have a learning goal of increasing their general knowledge of working with an elderly patient population and seek out a one-day conference (eight hours) covering a variety of topics. Another RMT may have a learning goal of increasing their knowledge of working with an elderly patient population that has mobility issues; this RMT may seek out a lecture (two hours) on mobility rehabilitation in a geriatric population provided by a physiotherapist at a local university.

My self-assessment summary report identifies Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-Racism as a category in which I can improve. Can I count the CMTBC-authored mandatory online course for 2024 as my learning activity for that goal?

No. The 2024 CMTBC-authored online course Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-Racism cannot be used as a learning activity for your 2024 PDP.

Should an RMT identify and create a learning goal to improve in the category of Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-Racism, a different learning activity would have to be selected to meet their stated learning goal.

How do I document learning activities?

RMTs must maintain adequate support records, for a minimum of three years, to document their completion of any learning activities.

All support records must accurately state the date and time the learning activity was completed. There are many different options for maintaining adequate support records that would be considered acceptable.

Different forms of documentation that provide evidence for completion of learning activities could include:

  • Certificate of completion
  • Proof of attendance at a conference
  • PDF copy of agenda and meeting minutes for a study or practice group
  • Transcript record

Documentation for less structured learning activities, like review of the Standards of Practice, Bylaws, and notices to the profession, and study groups or critical appraisal of research articles, could include, but is not limited to:

  • Review of Standards of Practice, Bylaws, and notices to the profession:
    • RMTs can create a record of the date, length of time, topics, or documents reviewed, and any notes taken during review.
  • Study groups or practice networks:
    • Each group should designate a member of the group as a minute taker. Their task would be to record the date, time, participants in attendance, what was discussed, and any additional notes. The designated minute taker would then distribute the minutes to everyone in attendance as a record.
  • Review of research:
    • RMTs can create a record that includes the date, the specific full text PDF document(s) reviewed, and any notes taken during review of the research.

When creating documentation for any of the learning activities listed above, it is best to send an email to yourself, or save a PDF to your computer to ensure that you have an accurate record of the date and time the learning activity was completed.     

RMTs will not be required to upload any documentation to the PDP Portal or the Registrant Portal. RMTs will be asked to submit their documentation to the College only if selected for an audit to verify compliance with PDP requirements.

How should I complete the self-assessment if I don’t have areas for improvement?

Ensure you are taking your time to reflect on your performance and application of the competencies in your practice on a regular basis. 

Be honest with yourself when answering the questions and consider the difference between understanding a competency and the application of that competency in practice. Many times, we understand what is expected of us but do not fully act in compliance with the expectation. Take these opportunities to further your learning in a specific competency and adjust or change how you implement that competency into your practice.     

No matter where you are in your career, there is always an opportunity for growth and development within your practice.

What will be reviewed by the College during an audit?

An audit process will be used to verify an RMT’s compliance with PDP requirements. RMTs will be randomly selected to undergo the audit process each year.

During an audit, the College will confirm that you have written full answers in the text boxes relating to your learning goals, learning activities, and reflection. The College may also ask you for documentation that confirms you have completed your stated learning activities.

The College will only check that you have completed your self-assessment. The College will not use your answers to the self-assessment questions for another purpose or penalize you for a low ranking on a self-assessment question.

RMTs are trusted by the public to provide safe, effective, and ethical healthcare at all times throughout their career. This requires RMTs to be lifelong learners who are individually responsible and accountable for their ongoing professional development. The College’s expectation is that registrants approach the PDP requirements with integrity and good intentions.

During an audit process, as long as an RMT has completed the PDP requirements truthfully and in good faith, the aim of the audit is only to confirm:

  • Completion of all self-assessment questions;
  • Completion of two learning goals;
  • Documentation indicating completion of each learning activity; and
  • Completion of reflection questions.

Some of the functions and features described in the how-to video and documents within the PDP Portal are not working correctly for me. What do I do?

Although the PDP Portal is accessible on all electronic devices with browsers, we recommend that you use the most up-to-date version of your browser – Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Firefox, or Safari.

If you are using the most up-to-date version of your browser and are still experiencing problems, please proceed in the following way:

  1. Use a different browser to access the PDP Portal. For example, if you are using Firefox switch to Google Chrome.
  2. Email CMTBC at [email protected] with the following information:
    • What type of device you are using – laptop, tablet, cell phone?
    • Which Internet browser, including version of browser, are you experiencing the problem on?
    • What is the problem or error message you are seeing on the screen? Please provide a screenshot, if applicable.

I have set one of my required learning goals and now must find a learning activity. Is there a list of approved courses that CMTBC provides to RMTs?

No, CMTBC no longer publishes a list of approved courses offered by external course providers on its website. 

It is at an RMT’s own discretion what learning activities they will select to best achieve their stated learning goals. The following list provides different ways in which an RMT can find different learning activities.

  • Reach out to colleagues
    • Colleagues, including both RMTs and colleagues from other health professions, can be a great place to start for recommendations on learning opportunities. If you are seeking opportunities for a learning activity on a specific topic, consider reaching out to colleagues with experience and further knowledge and education on the specific topic.
  • College or university continuing studies
    • College and universities offer a variety of continuing study courses that are available for anyone to take. Courses offered will range in length and can be available online or in-person.
    • For example, programs include:
    • Online searches
      • Online searches, using a search engine like Google or Yahoo, can feel overwhelming. There are several ways that you can create better search results.
        • Use keywords and phrases. Take the time to think about which keyword or phrase is most relevant to your needs. This will help make sure you are targeting the right web pages.
        • Take advantage of advanced search features that allow you to narrow your results by date, location, etc.
        • Use quotation marks around exact phrases.
        • Use a minus sign (-) before a specific word to exclude it from your search results.
        • Use Boolean operators like AND, OR, and NOT to narrow or broaden your search results.

While the process of searching for and selecting learning activities may seem overwhelming at first, it provides each individual RMT with the opportunity to engage in learning activities that meet their learning goals, are presented in their preferred learning style, and are offered within a time frame that suits the RMT’s lifestyle, location, and financial situation.  

Can I create a learning goal and complete a registrant-directed learning activity related to my role as a business owner, such as taking a course on opening a business or book-keeping?

No, learning goals and registrant-directed learning activities relating to business practices do not meet PDP requirements.

The PDP focuses on the core professional and practice competencies of massage therapy and the application of these core competencies by an RMT in practice.  Learning goals and the selection of registrant-directed learning activities are to address competencies that require further knowledge or application in massage therapy practice.     

I would like to organize a study group. Are there guidelines that should be followed?

When organizing a study group, it is important to create an agenda for the study group to follow to help set a purpose and plan for the groups time together.

Consider the following questions as a starting point for organizing an effective study group:

  • What is the purpose/goal of the study group?
  • Who will be involved in the study group? How big will the study group be?
  • What is the frequency and duration at which the study group will meet?
  • Who will organize the study group agenda?
  • Is there pre-reading material for the study group, like reference papers/articles/books that need to be reviewed?

If the study group is meeting to review research evidence, the following questions can help to start and focus discussion within the study group:

  • What reference papers/articles/books are being reviewed today? Provide material to all members of the study group for pre-reading.
  • Review the quality and source of the material. Is the material from an evidence-based source of information?
  • What does the reference paper/article/book say? Summarize.
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the information presented within the reference paper/article/book?
  • Are there any challenges/opposition to the ideas presented by the author(s)?
  • How does the information presented in the reference paper/article/book influence your massage therapy practice?
  • When could this information or practice approach benefit your patients?
  • When could this information or practice approach negatively impact your patients?
  • What further questions arise from review of the reference paper/article/book?

If the study group is meeting to review techniques or skills, the following questions can help to start and focus discussion within the study group:

  • What reference papers/articles/books are being referenced? Provide material to all members of the study group for pre-reading.
  • Which techniques or skills will be reviewed?
  • When are these techniques or skills indicated or contraindicated in practice?
  • How would you describe the technique/skill to your patients, to obtain informed consent?
  • How will you practice the technique/skill within the study group? How will feedback be provided?
  • What further questions arise from the study group session?

During the study group, a member of the group can be designated as a minute-taker to record the date, time, names of participants in attendance, what was discussed, and any additional notes. The designated minute-taker would then distribute the study group agenda, pre-reading material, and minutes to everyone in attendance as a record of the learning activity.

After completing my self-assessment, I have identified four competency areas for which I would like to create learning goals. Do I have to complete all four in one year?

No, you are not required to complete all four in one year. The PDP requires you to complete 2 learning goals and 2 learning activities, one for each learning goal.

While an RMT may choose to engage in more than 2 learning activities over the course of a year, they are only required to complete the learning plan and reflection section of the PDP program for two of their learning goals and associated learning activities.

RMTs who have identified more than two competency areas in which they would like to improve are encouraged to reflect on which competencies they wish to make learning goals for first, considering the impact learning in those areas will have on their practice and the availability of learning activities. Any additional competencies the RMT has identified can be carried forward to the next year’s PDP.

When does the PDP have to be completed by?  

All Practising RMTs are required to complete the following requirements each year, by October 31:  

  • Completion of a self-assessment;
  • Development of a learning plan based on self-assessment results, consisting of two specific learning goals;
  • Completion of two registrant-directed learning activities – one for each specific learning goal;
  • Completion of a reflection to evaluate the impact each learning goal and its associated learning activity have had on the RMT’s practice.

Completion of the PDP is a registration renewal requirement.

I found a course that is scheduled after October 31. How can I use this course as a learning activity? ​ 

A learning activity that is offered in November or December can be used as part of the RMT’s learning activities for the next year’s PDP program.​ 

An RMT may decide to carry over a learning goal to the following year if they have found a learning activity that is appropriate, but the timing does not work for the current year’s PDP completion date of October 31.

This means that the RMT would need to select two different learning goals and activities to fulfil their current year’s PDP requirements by October 31.

What happens if I don’t complete my learning activities by October 31? 

If an RMT fails to meet the PDP requirements by October 31, the RMT is subject to a non-compliance fee as set out in Schedule “B” of the Bylaws

The RMT would still be required to complete their outstanding PDP requirements before being able to renew their registration for the following year.  

What is a ‘critical appraisal’ of a research article? ​ 

Critical appraisal is the process of carefully and systematically examining research evidence to judge its trustworthiness, as well as its value and relevance in a particular context.​ 

In simple terms, it is looking at what question the researchers are asking, and how well they went about it answering it. Could the researchers have performed the research differently and what is the impact of the researcher’s results?  

Critical appraisal allows you, as an RMT, to determine whether research evidence is true (free of bias) and relevant to your practice.  

For more information review the Evidence-Based Practice page in the Resources for Registrants section.

Is a self-paced review of textbooks, different levels of research evidence, Bylaws, or standards of practice an appropriate learning activity?

Yes, these are appropriate learning activities.

It is important for an RMT who would like to engage in self-paced review to create an agenda, similar to an agenda for a study group, to help set a purpose and plan for their review. 

RMTs who complete self-paced reviews must also ensure they are keeping appropriate documentation, including the date, length of time, topic, and self-review notes. 

“Take care of my own health and well-being in order to provide patient-centred care” has come up as an opportunity for improvement. Would a self-care course such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, cognitive behavioural therapy skills, stress resilience, or meditation qualify as an appropriate learning activity?

It is important to differentiate between personal development and professional development. The PDP focuses on the core professional and practice competencies of massage therapy and the application of these core competencies by an RMT in practice. 

When considering learning activities related your own health and well-being, it can be helpful to consider the following:

  • Am I engaged in a learning activity or receiving a service?
    • Being engaged in a learning activity means you are actively engaged in the process as a learner.
    • Receiving a service, like attending a therapy session, is not considered an appropriate leaning activity for the purpose of the PDP. 
  • Consider if the learning activity is:

“Provides comprehensive homecare” has come up as an opportunity to improve. Can I take yoga teacher training, Pilates training, or a kinesiology class to better understand the details of exercise therapy and how to teach it to patients?

No matter the learning activity an RMT may select to take, it is important to be mindful that the entire content of the learning activity may not fall within a BC RMT’s scope of practice. It is up to each individual RMT to make sure they incorporate learning into their practice in an appropriate way that ensure compliance with the Scope of Practice, Evidence-Based Practice, and Consent Standard of Practice. 

For example: An RMT may decide to take a course on Pilates. The course provides information on how to provide Pilates training to a single person and to a group.  One on one or group Pilates training is outside a BC RMT’s scope of practice. The RMT would be responsible for ensuring that the information they learn within the course was provided to patients as an adjunct to massage therapy treatment, as per section 4 of the Scope of Practice Standard of Practice.

Can the College provide an example of creating a learning goal and selecting a learning activity?

The following is a case study of RMT Ridley creating one of their learning goals and selecting a learning activity as part of a learning plan. Note that the case study is an example of how an RMT can create learning goals and select learning activities. Each RMT’s process of creating learning goals and selecting learning activities will be unique.  

Upon completion of their self-assessment, Ridley reviewed their self-assessment summary report. The following graph shows their self-assessment category averages:

From the graph, Ridley can see the following:

  • The Knowledge Growth category average is some of the time. This is the lowest category average for Ridley and should be considered as a category where the RMT can engage in further learning to improve their knowledge and application of competencies in practice.
  • The categories of Communication, Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility, and Anti-racism, and Professional Obligations all have category averages of most of the time. The RMT can consider in which one of these categories they wish to improve their knowledge and application of competencies.

Creating a Learning Goal

Ridley has determined that they would like to improve their average score in the Knowledge Growth category. To assist Ridley’s understanding of what area(s) within the Knowledge Growth category to focus on, Ridley reviews their individual responses to each question within the Knowledge Growth category. 

Upon review of their answers, they see they answered “some of the time” to:

  • Engaging in learning activities that develop their knowledge, skills and clinical reasoning skills, and
  • Searching for, reviewing, and using research evidence to support clinical decision-making in their practice.

Ridley has been practising for 10 years. After reflecting on their practice and the patient population they work with, Ridley decides that they would like to update their knowledge and skills around working with patients pre- and post-hip or knee surgery. 

Ridley answers the following learning goal questions:

  • Category of self-assessment: Knowledge Growth
  • What area(s) within Knowledge Growth: To increase knowledge, skills, and the use of research evidence to support clinical decision-making.
  • Learning Goal: To update knowledge in the area of pre- and post-hip or knee surgery to best support patients within my clinical practice, within the next six months.

The next step for Ridley is to research and determine which type of learning activities they can complete to meet their stated learning goal. This may take some time and investigation on Ridley’s part to find a relevant learning activity. After speaking with colleagues and using internet searches to identify different learning activities, Ridley has a list of three different learning activities they could choose from, including:

  • Attending a two-part lecture series at the local university, hosted by an orthopaedic surgeon.
  • Attending a lower body hands-on class, hosted by an RMT who works with professional athletes.
  • Creating a study group with colleagues, specifically a physiotherapist, chiropractor, and RMT, all of whom have experience in treating a diverse patient population with lower body injuries.

Ridley decides to participate in the two-part lecture series, and begins to complete the following learning activity questions.

  • What type of learning activity: Other – Lecture Series.
  • Describe the Learning Activity:
    • Learning activity title: Post surgical rehabilitation for lower limb injuries.
    • Learning activity takes place over two lecture sessions, both two hours long.
  • Target date of completion: June 15, 2024.

Ridley saves the learning activity information they have inputted to date, and registers for the lecture series.

At this time, having created Learning Goal 1 and decided upon a learning activity to achieve the goal, Ridley can begin to repeat the process to create a second learning goal. Upon further investigation into which area(s) within the three categories where they have an average score of most of the time, Ridley determines they are most interested in completing learning activities to improve in the category of communication

Completion of Learning Activity

After completion of the lecture series on June 15, 2024, Ridley returns to the PDP Portal to input detailed information about their learning activity, including the objectives of the lecture series, how the activity falls within scope of practice, and the level of evidence used within the activity.

Once information on Ridley’s learning activity is completed, they complete their Learning Goal 1.

Upon completion of Ridley’s second learning goal and activity, following the same steps, Ridley will be prompted within the PDP Portal to submit their completed learning plan. Submission of a completed learning plan will release the final step of the PDP: Reflection. 

I have completed both of my learning goals, however, I would now like to change one of my goals. How can I reset my learning goal?

An RMT can request any portion of the PDP to be reset. To request a reset of your PDP or a specific portion, please contact the College via email at [email protected] for assistance with this process.

Practice hours

CMTBC is introducing a practice hours requirement. To maintain Practising registration with CMTBC, an RMT will be required to make, during the registration renewal process, a declaration that they have obtained 500 practice hours within the previous three (3) years, or that they have met the practice hours requirement through an approved alternative. Registrants will be asked to report their practice hours for the first time when completing registration renewal for 2026.

To learn about the Practice hours requirement, read the FAQs below and see the Practice Hours page.

When do RMTs have to make a declaration regarding practice hours?

The first time that RMTs will be asked to make a declaration regarding practice hours is when completing registration renewal for 2026. All RMTs who are maintaining their Practising status and those RMTs who are changing from Non-practising to Practising status will be required to make a declaration.

Is there a minimum number of practice hours required to be completed during each year of the preceding three-year period that will be reviewed for calculating practice hours?

No, there is no minimum number of practice hours that must be obtained each year. It is the accumulation of practice hours over the preceding three-year period that is reviewed. This is because it is not uncommon for RMTs to take time away from practice for up to a year.

Example 1:

  • An RMT accumulates 300 practice hours in 2023, 600 practice hours in 2024, and 900 practice hours in 2025. At the time of registration renewal for 2026, the RMT has a total of 1,800 practice hours over the previous three-year period, meeting (and exceeding) the practice hours requirement.

Example 2:

  • An RMT who has had to take a leave of absence from working accumulates 900 practice hours in 2023, no practice hours in 2024, and 50 practice hours in 2025. At the time of registration renewal for 2026, the RMT has a total of 950 practice hours over the previous three-year period, meeting (and exceeding) the practice hours requirement.

Example 3:

  • An RMT who is working less than part-time accumulates 100 practice hours in 2023, 150 practice hours in 2024, and 125 practice hours in 2025. At the time of registration renewal for 2026, the RMT has a total of 375 practice hours over the previous three-year period. The RMT has not met the practice hours requirement. The RMT will be required to complete a substitution for those practice hours, such as College-approved remedial course work.

What activities can be used toward practice hours?

  • Clinical practice.
  • Working as an Educator/Clinical Supervisor in a massage therapy education program that is fully accredited by the Canadian Massage Therapy Council For Accreditation (CMTCA).
  • Teaching in post-graduate education, courses, or conferences that fall within the scope of practice of massage therapy.
  • Regulatory or professional association work.
  • Working in a research or academic position.

Any work task that is required of an RMT to perform their professional activities can be counted toward practice hours.

Examples:

  • Time spent charting and/or writing communication to other health professionals or a third-party regarding treatment provided to a patient;
  • Time spent preparing, creating materials, and engaging with students as an educator, or presenter at a conference;
  • Time spent performing research tasks, such as writing a thesis.

RMTs must ensure all their practice hours are adequately documented.  

Can administrative work at a clinic be counted toward my practice hours?

Practice hours are acquired when a Practising RMT performs professional activities that fall within the scope of practice of massage therapy, as defined by the Massage Therapists Regulation. Therefore, administrative work such as reception and operation of a business cannot be counted toward practice hours.

Scenario: I currently hold Practising status. Next year (2024) I will be taking a year off from work and changing to Non-practising status. In 2025, I plan to return to Practising status and work on a part-time basis. Is there a reduced or pro-rated number of practice hours required in this circumstance?

No, the requirement for 500 practice hours remains the same.

All Practising RMTs are required to meet the practice hours requirement in one of the following ways:

  • Obtaining 500 practice hours within the previous three years.
  • Recent graduation from a massage therapy education program that is fully accredited by CMTCA.
  • Successful completion of CMTBC-approved remedial course work within the last 18 months, or another approved substitution for the requirement.

If an RMT who holds Practising registration has not met the practice hours requirement for the preceding three years, they will be required to complete a substitution for those practice hours, such as College-approved remedial course work.

Scenario: I work as a part-time RMT and may not be able to meet the practice hours requirement. Will the College automatically cancel my registration in 2026?

No, an RMT will not immediately be required to change their status to Non-practising or resign their registration if they have not met the practice hours requirement at the time of registration renewal for 2026.

If a Practising RMT or a Non-practising RMT converting to Practising status at the time of registration renewal for 2026 is unable to meet the practice hours requirement, they will be required to complete a substitution for those practice hours, such as College-approved remedial course work. 

In this situation, the RMT would be able to renew as a Practising registrant upon agreement with the College to complete the substituted activity by a specified deadline. 

What kind of remedial course work will I be required to take if I don’t meet the practice hours requirement?

Further information regarding the process of remedial course work will be provided closer to the time of registration renewal for 2026.

What are the practice hours requirements for a Non-practising RMT?

While an RMT holds Non-practising status, they cannot obtain or record practice hours. Practice hours can only be acquired by an RMT while they hold Practicing status.

However, if at the time of registration renewal for 2026, an RMT holds Non-practising status and seeks to convert back to Practising status, they will need to make a declaration regarding their practice hours for the preceding three-year period (2023-2025). 

Scenario: I have held Non-practising status for the last three years as I recovered from an injury. I have zero practice hours, and do not meet the practice hours requirement.  How do I renew my registration as Practising for 2026 if I have been Non-practising in the preceding three years?

RMTs who have held Non-practising status for two years or more must submit an application form for review and assessment by the Registration Committee of their readiness for practice.

For more information on Registration Status Change: Non-practising to Practising, see the Practising/Non-Practising Status Change page.

I currently hold Practising status with CMTBC, and I live and work in Alberta. Can I use my clinical hours obtained by providing massage therapy in Alberta toward my practice hour requirement?

Yes. An RMT who holds Practising status can use their practice hours obtained in a non-regulated Canadian jurisdiction (for example Alberta, the Yukon, etc.) toward their practice hour requirement.

Any RMT who holds Practising status with CMTBC, irrespective of the jurisdiction in which the RMT works, is required to practice in accordance with their professional obligations as stated in CMTBC’s Bylaws, Standards of Practice, and Code of Ethics.

For more information

RMTs can contact [email protected] with questions about the FAQs, or with other questions related to the redesign of the Quality Assurance program.

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